Thoughts from some meditative knitting…

In between the work I have to do today, I have been knitting a few stitches here and there on a scarf that I have knit a time or eight before, the Traveling Woman, by Liz Abinante. I don’t know what it is about this pattern, but there is something very soothing about knitting it that turns me toward total relaxation. My brain engages, but it isn’t terribly complex. There is a palpable rhythm to it that is pleasing and brings calm. As I said, I have knit it eight times before.

The one I am currently knitting is from some of my early handspun. I had been spinning a few months when I went to  a week-long retreat with Judith MacKenzie (Judith’s bio from one of her teaching gigs). It was at this retreat that I was first exposed to drum carding as a means of blending fibers to spin more unique yarns. I carded up several small batches from the fibers available to us, and got to spinning. I was pleased to be learning new things and delighted with the yarn I had made.

now that I am knitting with it, more than a year later, let me say, this particular yarn is crap. Don’t get me wrong, it’s a fine blend of lovely merino and mohair and some silk and who knows what other luxurious fibers. but my spinning is total crap. It could be equally true that my first attempts at carding were crap. Yet I continue to knit with it because I can feel myself learning something. Whether I am learning about the feel of fiber too tightly spun or plied, or the optical blending of color and how that is successful or not for various reasons, or that it is sometimes not possible to count past five, I can’t say. but I am learning something, that much is clear.

Whether I am learning something about my spinning or my knitting, I can’t quite grasp. But it is very likely something about both of these, and how they can and do work together. As I knit, the pattern is totally familiar in a muscle memory sort of fashion. just another layer of soothing going on during the process. The thought that continually comes to the forefront of my brain is that it is time to again read The Knitting Sutra: Craft as a Spiritual Practice, by Susan Gordon Lydon. It’s a book that will have something new to tell me each time I read it.

SS week 2001 loresAlso going on around these parts, is some sketching. I am taking an online class called Sketchbook Skool. Totally worth the time and dollars. I can’t speak highly enough about it and I feel that there is something there for everyone.  I learned about it because I follow Danny Gregory’s blog  (linked right) and decided to jump in. the next semester begins in July and there is room enough for everyone, so c’mon…let’s do this! This spread was done a few weeks ago at Barnaby’s. The first semester group has well over 1000 people enrolled and there is a range of abilities from beginner to expert. There is a classroom and fb group to post work in and discuss (or not, no pressure), and plenty of people beyond the instructors to learn from. The art that is being made in sketchbooks globally is something pretty amazing to be a part of via this class.

Okay, enough jabbering on. I feel like there is more to say, but I also feel the grasp I have on exactly what is slipping away. More soon…

 

4 Responses to “Thoughts from some meditative knitting…”

  1. Jane Says:

    You’ve described my own knitting processes at the moment! To perfection. I’m learning with every recalculation, error, and new idea as I make my way through the piece I’m designing. Thank you for explaining me to myself!

    And I want want want to join the next semester of Sketchbook Skool. In the past I’ve sketched or made collages in my journals, and now would be a good time to do that again.

    XOXO

  2. Jaye Says:

    A couple of disparate thoughts that were linked when I first began to write them down…

    “now that I am knitting with it, more than a year later, let me say, this particular yarn is crap”………..I love this line, because it is universally true of many things we do that improve with the doing. It also needs to be remembered when we become overly enamored with our own skills…sort of a “best is yet to come” attitude that I think we cultivate as we age, if we’re lucky.

  3. knittingbuddha Says:

    I love this!

  4. knittingbuddha Says:

    Jane, it is so worth it. This has been one of the best classes I have done online, and stepping out of my comfort zone creatively (as in something not fiber) has been remarkable to me! I am adding a SBS photo album on my FB page…

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